Link

CRUNK JUICE

(2012) published by steve roggenbuck, online in the public domain…. I find this compilation a peaceful yet anxious reminder that I am alive…. these are some of his own highlighted responses:

“THIS IS WHERE BEAUTY
GOES TO DIE.” – ANONYMOUS COMMENTER
“AS SOMEONE WHO ENJOYS POETRY
I CAN SAY THESE ARE SOME OF
THE STUPIDEST THINGS
I HAVE EVER READ.”
“THIS SHIT IS NOTHING BUT
SHAMELESS SELF-PROMOTION.
YOU ARE A GIMMICK,
I CAN’T BELIEVE YOU TAKE
YOURSELF SERIOUSLY.”
“I WISH I COULD EXPRESS IN 140
CHARACTERS HOW INCREDIBLY
TERRIBLE YOUR ‘POEMS’ ARE.”

 

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If It Doesn’t Spread, It’s Dead

William Uricchio, a media history enthusiast and fellow intellectual (Director of MIT Comparitive Media Studies Program) to Henry Jenkins, author of Spreabable Media, writes an essay on the history of spreadable media, and he concludes with a great point:

 “Spreadability turns on the demands of publics, on processes of adaptation and localization, and on the construction of new meanings. The protocols and controls imagined by institutions, whether the state or religious authorities or the heavy industry of media, have historically had little impact on populations eager to share experiences and to modify them in their own ways. The spread of media and textual forms—whether to once-excluded social groups or to markets originally unimagined by media producers—owes as much to the interests and creativity of those outside constituencies as to the original producers.”

In my own words: as we can see that spreadable media “turns” on the public and social constructions of media environments, we may begin to realize that there are so many formats within media that can produce revolutionary meaning in our digital culture today. We, the creative people, make up parts these “authorities” and “institutions”–we have ultimate control over the inputs and outputs of media and it is important to recognize that. If we continue to manipulate the forces that attempt to hijack new media projects, we will successfully impose our own “imaginary” protocols upon the authorities of intellectual and creative property. We must keep the voice alive, must keep going viral, keep sharing, reblogging, reposting, retweeting because…if it doesn’t spread, it’s dead!

 

Cannibals Unite: Shamelessly

Hello all,

As I sit here listening to a playlist I “created” Spotify, I realize that I have one of the largest databases of the music and recording industry to use at my leisure. What differs with Spoitfy or Pandora versus Napster or other music downloading sites like UTorrent or Limewire, though– is that I cannot “own” the music, burn the music to a CD or share it with my friends on a file. This is a shift in the digital format of music happening right before our eyes. If I am correct, the documentary, RIP: Remix Manifesto began in 2007 as Spotify was on the rise (2006). I wonder what GirlTalk or the producers of this documentary have to say about these new audio databases.

I don’t see how the copyRIGHT will ever win this battle. We, the bloggers, consumers, collaborators are becoming the copyLEFT and law enforcement will eventually be forced to surrender to the power of media sharing. I think it’s inevitable that it will continue–it’s human nature to always want to create the next “better” version of what existed before. We build upon the past, we are constantly progressing–in the most literal sense of the word. In the documentary GirlTalk said that creation of this caliber is now “a conversation, it’s participation.” The audience (us) now has the ability (or freedom) to give feedback online in real time. What does that mean for the copyRIGHT?

I want to leave you with another quotation from the film, the narrator/director says that “only cannibalism unites us together socially, culturally economically, politically…” and what he means is that we cannibalize each other’s ideas, thoughts, art, music, creations in order to create new ideas, thoughts ect…there’s really no such thing as originality as Aaron also points out in his latest post. It is hard for us in the digital age to claim an idea as intellectual property when everything is so easily accessible. Maybe some have ill intentions with someone else’s work, but that’s another conversation. With people like GirlTalk who like to sample music–he is just accessing his own creative outlet and encourages us all to do the same. Maybe the message here is: All is fair game when you put it on the internet….